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DIY wedding decor

DIY Macrame Wall Hanging and Handmade Headpiece For a Green and White Boho Wedding at Cripps Barn in the Cotswolds by Maryanne Weddings Pin Image

Macrame Wall Hanging and Handmade Headpiece For a Boho Wedding at Cripps Barn

Hannah & Tom’s summer wedding at Cripps Barn is an eclectic mix of beauty. There’s Hannah’s homemade fantasy headdress, not one, but three celestial wedding cakes, and last but by no means least a gorgeous macrame wall hanging lovingly woven by Hannah herself. The barn is also drenched in foliage and ferns, and Hannah and Tom’s gorgeous day culminates with a seriously hot choreographed first dance. Ready to take a look? Thought so!

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DIY Wooden Pallet Wedding Sign | DIY Order of the Day | Wedding Decor | Rustic Wooden Sign with Vibrant Faux Flowers Pin Image

How to Make a DIY Order of the Day Sign Using Wooden Pallets for £10

Here at Rock My Towers we LOVE the use of a beautiful sign at a wedding. They make a great talking point and infuse a heap of personality and fun into the décor. And what better way to add real impact, but for very little cost, than with an Order of the Day crafted out of a wooden pallet.

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DIY Friday – Summer Swings & Fancy Gold Frames.

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I have two DIY projects for you lucky folks today. They are ridiculously simple to create and are quite possibly the most striking and iconic of all the wedding decor that I’ve knocked together in RMW history!

When we released our ballet inspired shoot earlier in the week you lot got yourselves in a right old spin (or should that be a “Pirouette”) about the MAHOOOSIVE golden picture frame and THAT golden garden swing…

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King Of The Swingers

So, so, so simple… All you need is a plank of wood for the bench, a drill with a wide attachment (Ooh er missus) some spray paint to tie the swing in with your colour scheme and the secret ingredient… Sash cord.

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Why sash cord? well… it’s a bit more dainty than rope and is still very strong – but best of all you can get it from your hardware store of choice and its cheap. I found some in Homebase for £6.00 and FYI similar strength rope in the right quantity was 3 times this price and a little bit… Well… Ugly.

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All you need to do is drill two holes. Find a drill bit that is as similar in width to your cord as possible so that when you thread the sash cord and knot it there is no chance of the knot pulling through the whole… You don’t want the swing giving whilst Aunty Maggie ‘taking the weight off’ at your reception.

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For our shoot we then made the sash cord even prettier with the addition of florals and ribbon. It really is that easy.

Although I must state at this point that this swing is meant to be entirely ornamental and is not suitable for regular use… No load bearing calculations were done prior to this shoot so please bear that in mind. (You might want to mention it to Aunty Maggie too).

There is only one problem with this swing and that is that once you have created it all work stops while everyone queues up to have a go… Here you can see a fairly exasperated Lolly, hand on hips as the blog queen hogs the swing.

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I Was Framed

We love the idea of using frames at your wedding in your outdoor space… but for the ballet shoot we wanted to go one step further and get hold of a single huge golden frame to show how one could be used in your portrait shots or small group photographs.

The trouble is, big frames are generally pretty expensive – so I set about creating one on a shoestring.

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I actually created this golden monster out of skirting board, about twenty quids worth – the golden spray paint was only about eight pounds and everything else you need for this DIY demon can be found in your dads shed. Although I’m not sure how many dad’s have a pretty pink set square like me.

Here Is How You Do It

1. measure out how big you want your frame to be and simply use your right angle set square to mark up the corners and cut them carefully with a saw. You don’t have to be massively accurate, as any lines that don’t quite meet we are going to fill and make good.

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2. Assemble the frame on the floor upside down and then use some scraps of wood and some super strong adhesive to stick all the corners together. Once stuck flip the frame over check it all over. You can see on my frame that there are some gaps that need filling.

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3. Fill the gaps, sand down and then you are ready to spray your frame gold… Ok, I know I had already sprayed my frame gold but do as I say not as I do!!

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There you have it… A massive golden frame which is light enough to carry around and will look ace in your portrait shots. I made things really easy by sticking the frame together with glue – of course if you see your self as a bit of a carpenter you can have a go with a hammer and nails but I found the results to be a bit more rickety (if you know what I mean).

I am more of a stick-it-and-go kinda guy.

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The frame looked great in our shoot especially when I got myself in the picture…

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So there you have it… Are any of you thinking of having some interactive props and decor for your outside space?

I’d love to hear your ideas and if any of you are thinking about recreating this DIY for your big day WE NEED PICTURES!!

Have a great weekend folks.

Adam x

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Miniature Wreaths – The How To.

I’m guessing that the majority of you reading this post are now sick to the back teeth of anything remotely Christmas-related.

You’ve munched your way through the super-sized tin of Roses and probably made yourself feel sick in the process, played enough board games to fulfill your year’s quota of ‘quality’ family time and made a permanent bottom shaped dent in the sofa courtesy of the 68,972 classic Christmas movies that you were compelled to watch.

I know I have.

So you’re probably thinking that a DIY wreath tutorial really isn’t top of your viewing priorities right now. Well, I’m here to persuade you that wreaths are not just for Christmas.

Wedding Wreath By Ann-Kathrin Koch

Many of you will know that I’m a huge fan of the wreath – in fact it is a gloriously versatile creature that can be used in all manner of ways as part of your wedding decor.

You don’t believe me?

Allow me to elaborate.

You see the wreath doesn’t just have to hang elegantly from the doorway of your reception venue although this does make for the most wonderful style statement.

No, indeed these foliage circlets can also make the most beautiful chairbacks and pew ends, double up as bespoke placenames at each guest’s table setting, or add an organic element to the wedding breakfast when integrated into table centrepieces.

Hell you can even crown yourself with these arcs of delight as a finishing touch to your wedding outfit if you want to.

The beauty of wreaths is that they are so incredibly easy to make. Honestly, hand on heart folks, I promise they are…all you need to do is follow these simple steps.

What You Will Need:

Essentials:

Circular wire wreath frame, florists wire, wire cutters, scissors (preferably florists scissors) and moss.

It’s Totally Up To You:

Foliage/Flowers – we used different varieties of eucalyptus and viburnum berries (I’d love to be able to tell you which ones but I am officially rubbish and cannot remember what the lovely market trader said they were).

Ribbon – to match your colour scheme.

DIY Wedding Wreath Step 1

Step 1 – First Base.

There are two basic techniques typically used in creating wreaths. The first consists of wiring materials to a metal base and the second involves applying them to a rounded straw or foam structure.

Floristry folks – feel free to jump in here if there are any others that I’ve missed.

I like wire frames the most as I think they offer bucketloads of versatility plus they’re sturdy enough for heavier materials such as thick branches and citrus fruits if you’re looking to introduce them into the mix.

I chose a double-wire frame to create a truly luscious wreath; if you’re after a more delicate and ethereal look and feel however I’d recommend purchasing a single-wire frame to help you on your way.

DIY Wedding Wreath Step 2

The first step is to pad out the main structure of your wreath base to give it substance.

I used moss as the base material for the wreath and picked up a huge bag at my local flower market for the grand total of £3.50. Cheap as chips!

Following the shape of the wire base, secure your moss to the frame using florists wire. I used several individual pieces and bunched them up next to each other to ensure that I created a really circular shape rather than relying on a single piece of moss to cover the whole base.

Top Tip: Don’t be afraid to really pad out your base with plenty of moss as it means you’ve got a really great foundation to work from – you don’t want to see any of the wire base in the finished product.

Step 2 – It’s All About The Bundles.

Select several stems of your different varieties of foliage to create small bundles. Aim for approximately 4-5 pieces of foliage per bundle and try to select stems of different heights to add interest.

DIY Wedding Wreath Step 3

Wire each bundle together by wrapping your florists wire tightly around the stems three times leaving the excess wire pointing downwards. Do not cut this excess off as you’ll need it later.

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Step 3 – Overlapping And Wrapping.

Once you’ve created your first bundle lay it flat against your wreath base and push the excess wire of the bundle through the moss padding.

Wrap the excess wire on the bundle tightly around the moss to secure it to the wreath itself. Secure the ends of the florists wire and cut off any excess if necessary.

DIY Wedding Wreath Step 5

Add a second bundle to your wreath overlapping the previous one by approximately half or whatever you feel is most appropriate. Secure this bundle to the wreath in the same way as you attached the first as outlined in step three.

Always make sure that you secure each bundle with the the stems pointing downwards towards you.

DIY Wedding Wreath Step 6

Continue adding bundles of foliage to your wreath following the steps above until the mossy base is fully covered.

Top Tip: I twisted the wreath slightly in an anti-clockwise direction each time I added a bundle on top of the one before to make the wreath easier to work with. This way you’re not forced to constantly change the position in which you’re working.

Don’t be afraid to intersperse clusters of holly, fruits, feathers, bells or other adornments that reflect your wider wedding decor amongst the greenery bundles.

DIY Wedding Wreath Step 7

If you’re striving for a really luscious looking wreath, try using greater numbers of bundles placed closely together for a thick and leafy feel. Don’t be too rigid with your placement of your bundles either as you’ll lose the sense of the organic that makes wreaths so beautiful.

DIY Wedding Wreath Step 8

Top Tip: Don’t try to include too much foliage in a single bundle – a thick bunch of greenery can be difficult to wire together making the whole process cumbersome and your fingers hurt.

Step 4 – Beribboning.

Finish off your fantastic creation by looping a ribbon of your choice around the wreath and securing it tightly. We loved the simplicity of the mossy base as well as the foliage filled circlet so we opted to show you both.

Which is your favourite?

DIY Wedding Wreath Step 9

So there you have it, a foolproof step by step guide to making your very own circlets of glory.

The perfect way to wile away a rainy afternoon – from the looks of the weather forecast folks there’s plenty of time to make literally hundreds of them.

All my love Lolly xxx

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Pegs, Wool And Wood – A D.I.Y Polaroid Photo Frame.

For our recent Rough Luxe inspired Real Bride shoot I created a Rough Luxe photo holder. A simple painted wooden frame with wool stretched across it, finished off with mini wooden pegs to grip on to your chosen images.

Today I thought I would show you how easy it is to make one of these little ‘washing lines’ for your photographs. It’s a great bit of decor for your reception venue that will not only look ace but also entertain your guests.

You’ve Been Framed

All you need is some very basic tools to make the frame – a pencil, a saw and a set square. Don’t worry if your set square isn’t as snazzy and pink as mine. A normal boring set square will work just as well.

Cut your wood (which you can get from any hardware store for a couple of quid) at right angles and assemble your frame. The frame doesn’t need to be too strong so you should be fine to just stick the wood together with PVA glue. If your cutting skills aren’t quite up to Nick Knowles standards don’t worry – if you have a few gaps on your joins you can use a bit of filler to smooth everything out before applying paint to suit your colour scheme.

A Wooly Wonder

Once your frame is cut, stuck and painted it’s time to get the wool out. I went for a grey to match the frame but you could use contrasting colours instead. Wool is quite good at gripping so you should be able to wrap the wool around the frame a few times and not worry about it slipping or moving too much. Tie the wool off at the back of the frame.

The mini pegs are available from Hobbycraft and I think they work really well. You could of course scale up this whole project and use normal size pegs.


A Picture Paints A Thousand Words

You can use any photographs you like – Maybe pictures of you and your partner growing up… Images from stag and hen do’s could work well (if they are suitable!) or perhaps images of your guests.

For our Real Bride shoot, whilst Christian and Erica Ward were taking the official shots, I was skulking around with my polaroid camera like some kind of sickly paparazzi (I had a severe case of man-flu) snapping some behind the scenes shots to use in my photo frame.

If you are organised enough – it would be great to collect together polaroids taken during your wedding day and display those at your reception. It’s still a bit magical to see proper photographs printed and displayed so quickly after they have been taken.


So there you go.

It is a beyond simple idea that is so easy to create but it does look great. Also, everyone loves looking at photographs so a few of these dotted around your reception venue will be the perfect ice-breaker. And of course the colour, size and shape of the frame as well as the type and amount of photographs you use can all be adapted to suit your colour scheme and the size of your reception venue.

For a more luxurious finish you could use thin ribbon instead of wool and you can get mini silver pegs from Hobbycraft that look well bling. For a more rustic effect you could use string and leave the wood unpainted or perhaps even source some battered old timber to use.

Adam.

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